Dr Delanghe, Waterloo Chiropractor

Category

Nutrition

training and performance

I have written many times(1234)  about the importance of ingesting carbohydrates during a race (if it’s long enough).

I’ve also discussed how taking in other sources of fuel, like protein, is not the best move due to it triggering an increased risk of GI distress. The reason: in part, protein is not absorbed and metabolized as quickly as carbohydrates. Delayed gastric emptying results in water diffusing into your guts and increasing the odds of needing to take a PB-killing washroom break! iron sources

One thing I have heard in response to this tip from patients and athletes at H+P is that IF one is able to handle protein from a GI standpoint, is it worth experimenting with on top of carbohydrates as a fuel source? Is there an additional benefit to taking in protein during a race if it doesn’t bother your stomach? That is what we’ll be looking at with this article.

CLICK HERE to read the rest in the RunWaterloo magazine!

iron sources

When it comes to performance, there’s no doubt that nutrition plays a significant role. In the past, I’ve really focused on acute nutrition: what you can do directly before or during your run to be faster (i.e. here).

training and performance

An area I have neglected to focus on is what you should be doing from a nutritional standpoint on an on-going basis to stay healthy and perform at your best. One key area that I see as a recurring problem in my practice and athletes around me is iron deficiency anemia.

Iron has a number of roles in the human body. The most important function is how it is incorporated into hemoglobin and myglobin to facilitate oxygen transportation. If these proteins decline, our ability to transport oxygen to our working muscles also drops, and performance plummets along with it (such as here and here).

CLICK HERE to read more in the RW Magazine

I’ve written a few times (1, 2, 3, 4) before about how important it is to ingest carbs while racing a distance that takes over ~40-60mins to enhance performance. There still seems to be some resistance to doing this; some of it is fueled by pseudoscience, but some is fueled by the very legitimate concern that ingesting 30-60g of glucose/hour will cause GI distress and potentially an even more detrimental impact on performance.

There’s no doubt, GI distress is often caused by factors other than the carbs ingested during the race (such as ingesting slowly absorbed, slowly metabolized fat, protein or fibre in close proximity to or during a race). So before trying to fix your carb situation, first make sure that it is indeed your problem.shutterstock_335916845

Training the Gut

So how do we train the gut?  And does it work?  CLICK HERE to read my latest in the Run Waterloo Magazine. 

vitc

Last week I spent most of the week with a mild head cold. Nothing crazy, but enough to motivate me to review my old imtraining-and-performancemunology notes yet again to relearn what I already know (it’s always fun picturing the T-cells destroying the bad stuff). Times like these also motivate me to relearn other things, like how nothing gets rid of a cold other than some basics including: sufficient rest, fluids, stress management and a good diet.

Sometimes when I’m sick, I’ll also scan the literature for new research on the common cold. Usually it’s more of the same: sleep deprivation triggers a depression in immune function, more research is needed to show if supplement X helps, excessive exercise causes a depression in immune function while light exercise may help, and so on.

However, in today’s search, I came across something new that may help us cope with the common cold. The only downside is that this new information applies to a small subset of the population. It fact it’s so specific, it’s almost not worth mentioning and learning…other than the fact that the specific subset I’m referring to is exactly who we are: athletes to train vigorously in cold weather!

What does the science say?

In general, it’s has been proven time and time again that popping vitamins does not help to speed up the recovery associated with the common cold if you are already sick. Long-term supplementation also does not help to prevent the common cold. There is some research suggesting that long term supplementation may reduce the duration of the cold, but that always sounded like a lot of effort and money for a marginal improvement on something
that rarely happens.

So I had long given up on vitamin C. Maintain a healthy diet rich and fruits and vegetables, and that was all I needed in my mind (if I achieve said goal).

Continue reading HERE in the WRS Magazine 

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