Dr Delanghe, Waterloo Chiropractor

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We are extremely excited to welcome the newest member of the Delanghe Chiropractic and Health team: Stephanie Boville MSc, RD.

From weight loss and managing osteoarthritis, all the way to sports nutrition, Stephanie will be here to help you conquer any and all of your dietary concerns and goals!  With 6 years of post secondary education, and a strong science/evidence- based approach, only advice based on the BEST available research will be implemented.

No cleanses, magic powders or fad diets and no guessing.

How many grams of carbohydrates will you need to optimize your marathon performance?  Are you getting in enough protein to maintain muscle and enhance performance?  Are you taking in the right foods to decrease the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis?  Stephanie can help you!

What it takes to be an RD:

The process of becoming a registered dietitian is unlike any other designation for those offering advice on diet.  RDs are highly educated and trusted professionals for a reason!

The first step in becoming a dietitian is to complete a 4 year undergraduate degree from an accredited university program.  Once the future dietitian has completed their undergraduate degree, they must apply to an accredited internship program or masters program, which can be very competitive and must be accepted within 3 years of graduating from their undergraduate degree. The internship or masters program require the future dietitian to complete various competencies and log hours working under a certified dietitians. Rotations include public or community health settings, food service, diabetes, inpatient units and outpatient units within the hospital. If that isn’t enough, the dietitian is then required to write a 6 hour regulatory exam to demonstrate their knowledge and competence of being employed as a dietitian before they receive certification. Once the dietitian receives their certification, they are required to submit yearly self directed learning tools to prove to the college that they are committed to continuing their education and improving their skills in their nutrition practice. They are also subjected to randomly being selected for peer and practice assessment where the dietitian is evaluated by both patients and co-workers to assess their work performance and competency. If anything unusual is revealed in these assessments there could be further investigation by the college into the dietitian and action if they are found to be incompetent.  Because of this long road to become a RD, it’s clear why they can be the professionals trusted with your dietary health!

To learn more about Stephanie and her hours, click HERE.

Too book an appointment, call (519)885-4930.

vitc

Last week I spent most of the week with a mild head cold. Nothing crazy, but enough to motivate me to review my old imtraining-and-performancemunology notes yet again to relearn what I already know (it’s always fun picturing the T-cells destroying the bad stuff). Times like these also motivate me to relearn other things, like how nothing gets rid of a cold other than some basics including: sufficient rest, fluids, stress management and a good diet.

Sometimes when I’m sick, I’ll also scan the literature for new research on the common cold. Usually it’s more of the same: sleep deprivation triggers a depression in immune function, more research is needed to show if supplement X helps, excessive exercise causes a depression in immune function while light exercise may help, and so on.

However, in today’s search, I came across something new that may help us cope with the common cold. The only downside is that this new information applies to a small subset of the population. It fact it’s so specific, it’s almost not worth mentioning and learning…other than the fact that the specific subset I’m referring to is exactly who we are: athletes to train vigorously in cold weather!

What does the science say?

In general, it’s has been proven time and time again that popping vitamins does not help to speed up the recovery associated with the common cold if you are already sick. Long-term supplementation also does not help to prevent the common cold. There is some research suggesting that long term supplementation may reduce the duration of the cold, but that always sounded like a lot of effort and money for a marginal improvement on something
that rarely happens.

So I had long given up on vitamin C. Maintain a healthy diet rich and fruits and vegetables, and that was all I needed in my mind (if I achieve said goal).

Continue reading HERE in the WRS Magazine 

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